How to make your cookie game #WarriorStrong

Ingredients and supplies:

  • 1 W shield cookie press (available at the WSU Bookstore)
  • Sugar cookie dough (store-bought or homemade)
  • Flour
  • Royal icing — see instructions below
  • Sprinkles
  • Parchment paper
  • Mini spatula (OK, you don’t really need this — but it is fun to use)
  • Toothpicks
  • Cookie sheet
  • Oven
  • Cooling rack (optional, because we didn’t have one)
  • Camera (because we want pictures!)

Step 1:

Cover your cookie sheet in parchment paper (not pictured because we forgot).

Step 2:

Roll out the dough until it is about a quarter-inch thick. 

Knead the dough Roll out the dough

Step 3:

Sprinkle flour on the cookie press and press it firmly into the dough. Repeat until you run out of space. If they don’t look like the picture, you did it wrong!

Press cookie into the dough

Step 4:

Using your mini spatula (or whatever you substitute for this — a knife will do), remove the extra dough from the shields and place your cutouts on the cookie sheet.

Place on cookie sheet

Step 5:

Bake cookies according to dough specifications. Pro tip: The cooler the dough, the less the cookies will spread in the oven.

Step 6:

Do some homework while you wait for your cookies to bake.

Step 7:

Remove cookies from oven and let cool for a few minutes. Then, carefully move the cookies to a cooling rack. Note: This is not a job for the mini spatula.

Allow cookies to cool

Step 8:

Make the royal icing.

  • Option A: Invite your most talented baking friend over and have them make it.
  • Option B: Google it — and know that it’s quite the process!

Step 9:

Decorate the cookies according to your icing preferences.

Decorate the cookies

Step 10:

Do more homework while you wait for your cookies to dry.

Step 11:

Arrange on a plate, and prepare to wow your friends!Arrange on the plate

Step 12:

Show off your #WarriorStrong baking skills and beam with #WarriorPride by posting your cookies on your favorite social media channel. Don’t forget to tag us so we can see your creations!

 

Facebook: @waynestateuniversity

Twitter: @waynestate

Instagram: @waynestate

Snapchat: @waynestateuniv

Why is Facebook boring all of a sudden?

Have you noticed that Facebook is incredibly dull lately? Well, it might be because you are not seeing the amazing content from Wayne State in your feed anymore.

The good news

You can easily tell Facebook you want to see more of our content.

The easiest way to get us back in your feed:

The bad news

You still won’t see everything, but some Warrior content is better than no Warrior content, right?!

2017 in pictures

As we get ready to say hello to 2018, a look back at 2017 Photo of the Day shows what an amazing year we had on campus and in the Detroit area!

2017 top five

Photo of Old Main
Photo of the Day for October 25, 2017: “Hogwarts in Detroit?” Submitted by Rasik Mostafa.

Photo of the Day for May 14, 2017: Happy Mother’s Day Photo by Selma Medic-Cufurovic.

Photo of the Day for October 26, 2017: Season of colors Submitted by Komal Parab.

Photo of the Day for April 19, 2017: “Sky has no limit. Follow your dreams.” Photo by Dawn Turchin.

Photo of the Day for February 6, 2017: “Life as a 3 year old when your Mom is a PhD Nursing Student.” Photo submitted by Amanda Deriemacker

Photo of the Day stats for 2017 (Jan. 1 – Dec. 15)

  • 894 photos were submitted
  • 838 pics were up for consideration (56 were deemed unusable, too small, broken link, etc…)
  • 456 individuals submitted photos
  • 239 pictures were selected (27% of all submissions)

Connor Ashley and Shreyash Khond were our top repeat submitters.

  • Connor submitted 30 entries and was featured 7 times.
  • Shreyash Khond submitted 30 entries and was featured 5 times.

Old Main was one of our most popular subjects. It was Photo of the Day 26 times.

Engagement by platform

  • Flickr – 48,856
  • Twitter – 56,213
  • Facebook – 37,245
  • Instagram – 94,560

Total – 236,874

2017 Editors’ picks

Photo of the Day for October 5, 2017: “WSU giving some serious Hogwarts feels” Photograph submitted by Aiman Hussain.

Photo of the Day for May 5, 2017: “Captured this walking to my chemistry final at DeRoy Auditorium” Photo by Luis Coronel-Machado.

Photo of the Day for July 4, 2017: “Detroit Fireworks 2017. Thank you #waynestatepolice #detroitpolice #detroit #detroitfireworks #wsu Photo by James Laginess.

Photo of the Day for October 16, 2017: Behind the scenes of the Warrior Strong campaign.

Photo of the Day for December 13, 2017: Mary Lou Lynch, Maria Giammara and Hariette Williams didn’t get to graduate from college but their granddaughters did! Submitted by Jacqueline Giammara and Sha’Ron Williams

Hiring: Full-time Web Content Administrator

The Office of Marketing and Communications is looking for a Web Content Administrator. This role is filling the spot left by Jenn Di Sano, who is moving West to Arizona with her family.

This role is central to the digital communications for the university. It is a cross between crafting the information architecture for most all public facing university sites, to overseeing the official social media presence for the university, to being an influential force in what is posted to the university homepage.

The ideal candidate will be able to blend writing, training, user experience and social interaction into a role that has a large impact on the university and the world.

Background

The Web Communications team is located in the central university Marketing Office. We are set up like an internal agency and work with most areas of campus to create and maintain their public web presence.

We are a cross-functional team consisting of Web Content Administrators, Designers, Frontend Developers, Backend Developers and Multimedia support.

The mission of the central Marketing Office is to raise the stature of the university.

Primary responsibilities

Serve as primary resource for units university-wide regarding the content and appearance of unit Web pages. Administer and provide training in content management tools, control access, review sites for adherence and conformity to editorial and design standards and resolve related problems.

Develop and edit central university website and pages. Identify, select and condense news and events for inclusion on the homepage, prepare communications designed to effectively position the University, and ensure the delivery of key University messages.

Serve as liaison with IT personnel campus-wide to identify and resolve Web page related problems. Work with clients, designers and vendors to ensure established standards and expectations are met.

Develop and implement mechanisms and processes designed to evaluate the effectiveness of university electronic communications. Provide analysis of collected data and submit reports and recommendations as requested.

Maintain and support the university’s social media presence with a cross-functional team of writers, designers and content strategists

Collaborate with writers, editors, social media coordinators, video producers and photographers both in University Communications and in communications units across campus.

Provide support to the schools, colleges and central marketing department on social media strategy and campaigns.

Use metrics to determine the most effective channels to deliver content to audiences, measure their behavior and attitudes in response to that content and make recommendations based on the results

Oversee the day-to-day project management of large website projects by tracking progress, ensuring timely delivery and keeping the project within scope.

How to apply

Apply at jobs.wayne.edu. Posting #043246

Hiring: Full-time Frontend Web developer/UI designer

The Central Marketing and Communications Office is looking for an individual who is driven to create Web user experiences that bring the university brand to life and encourage action.

We are looking for someone with solid website design and UX experience. The individual will need to have enough HTML/CSS/JS experience to develop the frontend HTML through an existing build process and tooling.

Ability to blend technical expertise with a design aesthetic that embraces the university identity guidelines and explores new creative executions incorporating the university’s brand campaign. The ability to juggle multiple projects to meet project deadlines.
Ability to work collaboratively across disciplines — design, digital execution, editorial, marketing, to come up with new solutions.

Background

The Web Communications team is located in the central university Marketing Office. We are set up like an internal agency and work with most areas of campus to create and maintain their public web presence.

We are a cross-functional team consisting of Web Content Administrators, Designers, Frontend Developers, Backend Developers and Multimedia support.

The mission of the central Marketing Office is to raise the stature of the university.

Primary responsibilities

  • Experience collaborating throughout the entire project cycle, from research, strategy, information architecture, visual design, front-end development and maintenance.
  • A solid grasp of modern front-end web development, such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript and their associated build components.
  • Experience using a front-end web framework such as Foundation or Bootstrap.
  • An understanding of back-end web development environments, including HTTP, web servers, load balancers, the interpretation layer, databases and associated web frameworks.
  • Considerable skill in writing web applications that retrieve and update information in relational web-centric databases (using WordPress or Laravel).
  • The ability to clearly communicate to project stakeholders and process feedback internally and externally.
  • The ability to troubleshoot website layout and web application performance issues and resolve issues independently or direct issues to the responsible party.
  • Provide direct supervision to internal website interns and guidance to unit website content authors.
  • Ability to work with accuracy and attention to detail to meet deadlines.
  • Ability to understand and execute oral and written instructions, policies, and procedures.
  • Considerable project management skills, including the ability to provide time estimates and prepare accurate records and reports.
  • Proficiency in the use of web applications programming languages, tools, and/or methodologies for developing integrated web applications typically acquired through formal education or equivalent experience in web application development.
  • Demonstrated ability in analyzing customer requirements and developing basic information systems solutions typically acquired through one to two years of directly related experience in web application development and support.
  • The ability to translate functional requirements into cross-browser WCAG 2.0 compliant websites.
  • Strong understanding of web technologies and related user device capabilities required to access the web.
  • Understanding of test driven development.

How to apply

Apply at jobs.wayne.edu. Posting #043169

A good week on the web

The Web Communications team has been busy making updates, launching sites and improving the web experience for its users. In case you missed it, here are some of the items we’ve been working on this week.

New string series launched on wayne.edu

https://wayne.edu/story/creative-warriors-in-the-community

String stories are a new feature on wayne.edu

Every two weeks the Marketing and Communications team launches a new page that includes curated condensed articles that are all related to one topic. These new pages are called “strings”. This weeks string is focused on Creative Warriors featuring stories on healing through the arts, Jazz musicians in Detroit and community art projects.

All of the string stories showcase the work that is being done by our faculty, students and alumni.

The next string launches on Monday, October 16.

Facebook Live event featuring WSU Press

https://www.facebook.com/waynestateuniversity/videos/10155244871307968/

Example of graphics used for promoting the WSU Press Live Event

The social media team took you behind the scenes of the WSU Press office. A guided tour from their staff takes you from the front office to the warehouse and all the steps in between in publishing a new book.

This Live event is the first of many to come. Future events will feature sneak peeks and behind the scenes looks at our Warriors in Action.

Follow us on Facebook for announcements of the next live event.

Older sites migrated to a new server

All summer and into the fall our developers have been migrating sites off of an older server onto a newer, faster, and more secure environment. At the start of the project, there were over 200 sites to move and now they are down about 20. This week they have migrated:

Big things to come…

If you’ve been by the Marketing and Communications office lately, you may have felt a buzz in the air or maybe you’ve seen many us running around campus with film crews, or outside measuring light poles or witnessed some other fairly odd behavior. Well soon all will be revealed, but until then, the entire Web Communications Team is busy making sure all the web assets are in order to support this great undertaking by Marketing and Communications. If you are dying to know what we’re up to, follow us on the University’s social channels and you’ll get an exclusive first look on October 15.

 

Hiring: Student Web Intake position

The Web Assistant will report to the Web Content Administrator and will be the ‘front line’ contact for incoming Web requests through email and phone calls.

This person will take the initial request, respond and gather any additional information, complete the request (if small) or elevate it to a staff member when additional assistance is needed or is a larger request.

The position does require some existing knowledge of how the web works, basic HTML and familiarity with web-based content management systems.

The ideal candidate will have:

  • Good written and phone abilities
  • A basic understanding of HTML
  • A basic understanding of web usability
  • Comfortable editing pages in a web-based content management system
  • Experience resizing and optimizing images for the web
  • The ability to detect patterns of requests to create training material and document common responses to frequently asked questions
  • The ability to follow verbal and written directions with an eye for attention to detail

More about the position:

This is a part-time position, requiring 15-20 hours a week in the Marketing and Communications office.

The volume of requests varies per day, the average is 30-40 with most taking only a few minutes to complete.

The Web Assistant’s role in a request:

A request will come into the system and depending on the detail of the request:

You may need to follow up by email or by phone with additional questions

Once all information is available:

  • Determine which page(s) need editing.
  • Determine how these pages get edited (there may be multiple systems involved), which may require asking some questions internally about the page setup.
  • Ensure the primary contact is looped in on all changes.
  • Facilitate necessary changes (May take a few minutes to a few hours)
  • Gathering follow up questions/answers
  • After completion, follow up to let the requestor know the change has been completed.
  • While completing requests it will also be required to document common responses for consistency and to speed up future requests. It will also be required to work closely with the Web Communications team.

How to apply

If this sounds like you, email your resume and a cover letter to web@wayne.edu with the subject “Interested in the Web Assistant position”.

Global Accessibility Awareness Day 2017, Detroit

Thursday, May 18, 2017

6:30 PM to 8:30 PM

Bamboo Detroit

1420 Washington Blvd, Suite 301, Detroit, MI
$5.00 /per person

Event description

Back for the fourth year, Global Accessibility Awareness Day Detroit is a day to gather together to learn about digital accessibility and how to make the web more accessible for everyone. Events will be held around the world to raise awareness about web accessibility.

This year’s event is jointly hosted by Refresh Detroit and Ladies That UX Detroit.

Who is this event for?

If you’re working on the web, creating, developing, or designing websites or content for others to use, this event is for you! Or if you want to learn how we can work together to make the web accessible to everyone, we’d love for you to attend.

For our event, we’ve invited two local experts to talk about the importance of planning for accessibility in your design project and how to use an automated accessibility testing tool.

Agenda

6:30pm to 7:00pm: Welcome, food, refreshments, and networking
7:00pm to 7:10pm: Introductions
7:10pm to 8:20pm: Presentations
8:20pm to 8:30pm: Announcements and thanks to sponsor
8:30pm: Time to leave

Presentations

Design Before Code: Thinking About Accessibility from the Ground Up 
Caitlin Geier, UX Designer at Deque Systems

Think about accessibility when designing: don’t wait till it’s coded!  Caitlin will offer accessibility tips for designers so that time will be saved in development.

Introduction to aXE
Matt Isner, JavaScript Developer at Deque Systems

Learn how to check the accessibility of your web projects with aXe, a free Chrome extension and open source JavaScript accessibility testing engine.

Speakers

Caitlin Geier

 

As a UX designer, Caitlin’s work with accessible design flourished once she began working for Deque. She is passionate about understanding the users she’s designing for.

Caitlin continually strives to incorporate accessibility elements into her work in order to ensure that all users can benefit from inclusive design.

Matt Isner

 

Matt specializes in teaching development teams to plan, test, and code for accessibility and has helped orchestrate large remediation efforts of complex enterprise applications.

He is intrigued by the idea of the computer system as an expression of human neurobiology, and champions the notion that accessible web content is better understood by both humans and computers.

Sponsor

Deque Systems is a leading provider of web and mobile accessibility software and services. Our mission is digital equality, and the Deque team consists of leaders and innovators in accessibility and testing tools development.

We strive to provide practical accessibility solutions that reflect real-world development environments, and we work with a broad range of clients to not only fix their inaccessible content but to integrate accessibility into their existing design and development processes through the use of automation and training. Not sure about your site’s accessibility? Check it with aXe.

Updating a database display order with drag and drop in SQL

In many of our applications we support dragging and dropping datasets to change the order. We save this order in a database column that is an integer and is in sequential order.

There are many ways in javascript to handle drag and drop. I will show an example using jquery sortable. If you’d like to use something else there are three pieces of key information that need to be sent to the server:

  1. Current position
  2. Desired position
  3. User’s id

HTML list

Javascript sortable

Example data set for table todos

user_id display_order todo
2000 1 Take out garbage
2000 2 Clean house
2000 3 Do dishes
2000 4 Cut grass
2000 5 Change light bulb

Step #1 – Determine the position

Step #2 – Update the dragged item

Step #3 – Move the item down

Step #4 – Move the item up

Step #5 – Update the dragged item to the desired position

With this approach the server will do a total of three queries for every change to the display order no matter how many items are in the list. Examples typically tell you to iterate over every item to do an update query to set the new order. That approach results in total queries = total amount of items. This new approach is a significant improvement and has reduced a lot of our large data sets from 40+ queries down to three.

When less is more, A/B test insights

Last year we re-focused on the admissions area of wayne.edu to reduce the depth of the site (from five to two levels deep) and bring more resources to the front page. As a result the landing page highlights the six most popular audiences and their navigation items.

Each audience has its own landing page, with the same navigation and unique elements which speak to that audience. We found these audience landing pages were being visited less frequently than before the redesign.

Our theory

Initially, we thought users were clicking on a link below their audience heading and getting directly to their needed page. We decided to test this theory using a tool called Hotjar to record where users clicked on the page.

Admissions homepage clickmap

Although each audience listed their entire menu below the headings, the top three items were by far the most popular.

Revised hypothesis

We decided to test if removing the least popular items made it more clear to users that they could visit an audience landing page. If this is the case, are they more likely to visit these pages by clicking the audience heading or ellipse at the bottom of the link list?

“A” variant of the page

Admissions A variant

“B” variant of the page

Admissions B variant

Winner: Shorter list of links with the ellipses

After running the experiment for two weeks, Google found a statistically significant winning version.

Admissions experiment results

Headers or last item ellipse?

Admissions header vs. Ellipse

Of the clicks to the audience landing pages, the headers yielded ~2.5% of the clicks while the ellipses yield ~1%.

Insights

The takeaway from this experiment is it’s possible to go too far while reducing the depth of a website. Having everything accessible from the homepage may be good if you’re familiar with all the options, but it can be overwhelming for unfamiliar users.

Keeping a website as flat as possible while reducing the number of choices to entice users along yields the most interactions. It allows for the addition of refined and contextual content to reinforce a user’s decisions along each page of their journey.