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Feb 14 / Darryl Shreve

Oh, oh, it’s magic!

There is a feeling you get when tapping into that creative part of one’s self that transcends disciplines and skills. It is more about utilizing your personal gifts toward high achievement.

“I want to be a director.”

“I want to be a writer.”

“I want to be an editor.”

“I want to be a producer or camera operator…”

We are multifaceted beings, and although it’s true that we can learn to do or be anything, at our core we all have certain gifts that, when tapped into, lead to spectacular results.

“So, what are you saying?”

Not everybody’s meant to be a shooter, director, editor, producer, etc. Yes, you can learn the discipline and become quite proficient at it, but that does not mean you have found your creative destiny. We’ve all seen people in positions for which they were not well suited. They can do the job, but are absent of the magic. Work becomes all about checking off the box, collecting a check and not about creating something special.

“Well, artists can be flaky procrastinators.”

That’s putting it mildly, and every artist is guilty of that. I have found that there are two different mindsets for getting a job done, and it would behoove you to learn their differences and how to dance between the two.

ORDER and CHAOS

Mindset A taps into order. It finds ways of doing tasks efficiently with the least of amount of stress involved. There is no room for change. Being creative means copying or imitating some other proven idea.

Mindset B taps into chaos, abhors imitation and looks for unique solutions to every problem. The answers are often fluid, taking shape through inspiration, trial and error. This method is more stressful, but also more rewarding.

As an artist, it’s up to you to bridge those two mindsets and make it work.

-Creativity versus rigidity

-Originality versus imitation

-Innovation versus habit

-Uninhibited versus disciplined

You need to be able to draw inside and outside of the lines. Outside of the lines, however, is where you will most likely find that pixel dust that enables your imagination to fly.

“Pixel, not pixie? You did not just reference Peter Pan!”

Yeah, kind of. When you tap into that innate creative spark, you lose track of time. And any sort of rules that might ground you dissipate as you birth something new — whether it be a video, a piece of artwork, research or literary prose.

The creative process is not limited to artistic endeavors. A surgeon, lawyer, engineer, mathematician and even Captain Hook can experience that same excitement when tapping into their creative energy. It’s what separates a brilliant “fill in the blank” with the rest. These are folks who can step outside of the box to solve difficult problems in imaginative ways. So yes, people can function in a job proficiently, but it’s different when it’s not about the money. It is about going to back to a childlike state of openness and creativity.

Cue the fairy music.

-Singing notes versus emoting from a connected emotional experience.

-Writing words versus visceral descriptions that put the reader there.

-Painting images versus using colors to showcase pain or joy.

-Dancing a routine versus using the body to convey thoughts and feelings.

-Editing clips versus telling a story through pacing, color grade, graphics, music and shot selection.

The results are the same when it’s about more than checking a box: It’s magic.

 

Just saying.

 

One Comment

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  1. Medyum Han Hoca / Feb 21 2018

    I absolutely agree with you on this subject that originality and freedom are absolutely essential in a creative process ..

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