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Jul 6 / RAS

Your Amendment Rights for Right Amendments

Ah, the resubmission.  We all want to draw attention to the fact that we understand the concerns of the reviewers and really drive home the fact that the amended application addresses initial concerns (or maybe even did the first time around).  It’s hard to assert your strength in writing, but that’s why we have bold!  And italics!  And underlines!  And colors! But not so fast: should you be using these textual tools to identify the changes you have made since a previous submission?

 

While there is no outright rule against this, the NIH states:

You must include an introduction for all resubmission[s] that:

  • summarizes substantial additions, deletions, and changes to the application

               > individual changes do not need to be identified within other application attachments (e.g., do not need to bold or italicize changes in Research Strategy)

  • responds to the issues and criticism raised in the summary statement
  • is one page or less in length, unless specified otherwise in the FOA or is specified differently on our table of page limits.

 

(Preceding emphasis added, read more at Resubmission Applications.)  When you’re crafting your resubmission, keep in mind that the NIH expects corrections to be addressed in the introduction, and not anywhere else.  While it is not expressly forbidden, your reviewers may be less annoyed that you not only acknowledged previous concerns, but format direction as well.  Happy writing!