Happy Data Privacy Day!

Keep your messages safe!

January 28 is Data Privacy Day! To honor the day, I thought I would give a little tip to all of you Warriors.

If you are like me, I’m going to guess that you receive countless numbers of email per day. It is likely the most utilized tool for your daily tasks. Statista reported that 269 billion emails were sent and received each day in 2017 and that 293.6 billion will be sent per day in 2019 (Daily number of e-mails worldwide 2017 | Statistic). Though it is an amazingly helpful tool, it needs to be used in the best way possible. More than once, I have learned of personal data via email through the university’s email systems, which sends chills of fear up my spine. Though it may seem like your message goes straight from your computer to whomever will be receiving it, email is far from private.

The best analogy that I can give you to understand the security of email is by posing this question: Would you take your social security number, your date of birth, your contact information, and information for a couple of bank accounts; write it onto a post card; and drop it into a mailbox to be sent to a trusted friend?

I seriously doubt it. Email can easily be intercepted by the least experienced of hackers. Never give any personal, financial, or important information to someone via a regular email message.

You may ask, “So, how can I get this information to someone privately?” Use encrypted messaging!

Our IT Team has set it up so that sending a message using our Outlook service is absolutely simple. Here’s what you do:

  1. Write your message as you normally would.
  2. In your subject line add this before your message’s subject: #secure
  3. Send it!

That’s it! You are done. The recipient will receive an email that has special instructions as to how they can get to the message. Via their browser, they will be sent to a page in WSU’s Outlook account.

Data Privacy Day Bonus!

This is really a reminder for anyone who missed the message I posted for last year’s Data Privacy Day.
You can now never change your WSU password again.

Currently, every six months, you receive a message that informs you that you must change your password to access all the WSU systems (Academica, Wayne Connect, Canvas, STARS, etc.). Then, you rack your brain to come up with something you know you will remember and haven’t used before—blending that perfect amount of lower and upper case letters, numbers, and special characters.

You can now make a password for yourself and never have to do it again.

How, you ask?  Simple. Using the same requirements but make a password that has 15 or more characters in it. If you do that, you’ll never be asked to change your password again.

You ask, “How will I remember a password with 15 characters?”

I suggest choosing random words that are easy for you to remember, add a number and a character. Security experts have learned that using multiple random words (three and up is best) provides a great balance between usability and security.  These types of passwords are actually difficult for hackers to determine.

Next time you are asked to make a password, make one with fifteen characters. It will save you time because you will never have to do it again.

Don’t be a phish, take Google’s security quiz

Phishing graphic

Today I was sent a link by Geoff Nathan, WSU’s former privacy officer. It was a really nifty tool so I thought I would share it with you — Google just released a phishing quiz to test your knowledge on phishing messages. It takes eight minutes; you can finish it quickly.

WSU’s C&IT security team does an amazing job at keeping the majority of email scams out of your inbox, but in the event that you encounter one before we do, it’s best to be prepared. My apologies to any of you who have dreamed of joining the band Phish.

I am issuing a challenge to all of you: take the test.

Take Google’s Phishing Quiz

Vector Graphics by Vecteezy.com

Happy Data Privacy Day!

This is a day, internationally, to help remind everyone that their personal data is being processed every second of the day—whether it is through interactions at  work, the health field, public authorities, online purchases , or casual web surfing. On top of all that, if you are a smart phone user,  Apple or Google can likely tell exactly where you are at any minute of the day.

For these reasons, I’d like to offer a friendly reminder to be aware of your personal responsibility to protect your data to the best of your abilities.  The National Cyber Security Alliance offers some sage advice in the title of their online safety, security and privacy campaign:  Stop. Think. Connect.

Basically, the general idea is for you, as a responsible internet user, to always wade with caution into the open waters of the internet.  In the same way that you would not simply leap off a cliff into the rushing waters of a river without taking your personal safety into account, you shouldn’t randomly click every link that comes across your internet browser on your phone or computer.  This is also true of links in your email—even if it is coming from a friend.

TIP

If I can offer one action that everyone should do as they browse the internet or check mail, it would be to check the links you are clicking.  Whether you are using a browser or an email client, you have a status bar.  As you prepare to click on a button or web address  (STOP) glance down at the status bar to (THINK) make certain that the address looks legitimate and then (CONNECT) click it to go on to read and/or see more.

Here are two examples:

Figure 1: Checking a URL in your web browser
Figure 1: Checking a URL in your web browser

In Figure 1, you can see my browsing with Firefox to that bastion of good news, Buzzfeed.  You’ll notice that I’m pointing to a link (1) while the status bar indicates the URL where the link will take me if I click it (2).  In that status bar, read the URL address to see if it looks safe.  This works the same if you are using the university’s Outlook web interface (Wayne Connect), Gmail, or any other email provider.

Figure 2: Checking web addresses in Outlook email client.
Figure 2: Checking a URL in Outlook email client.

In Figure 2, While using Outlook to read Today@Wayne, I decide I want to read more about an article on the web.  I’m pointing to a link (1),  a tool tip pops up to tell me the URL that will open up in my browser (2), and the status bar also tells me the URL that will open up in my browser (3). Again, decide whether that link looks reliable.

By taking a few extra seconds, you can protect yourself from malicious code on a website or a phishing attempt via your email.

EXCITING NEWS TO CELEBRATE DATA PRIVACY DAY!

I am happy to announce that our cyber security team has been working on a project that will make life easier for all university users.

Currently, every six months, you receive a message that informs you that you must change your password to access all the WSU systems (Academica, Wayne Connect, Canvas, STARS, etc.). At that point, you try to come up with something you know you will remember and something you haven’t used before. To make certain it is accepted, you figure out a password phrase that uses lower case letters, upper case letters and numbers.

Well, here’s the good news.

In about a week, you can create a password and never have to make another one again.

How, you ask?  Simple. Using the same requirements, make a password that has 15 or more characters in it. If you do that, you’ll never be asked to change your password again.

Now, the question:  How will I remember a password with 15 characters?

You can choose random words that are easy for you to remember and simply put a space between them.  Security experts have learned that using multiple random words (three and up is best) provides a great balance between usability and security.  These types of passwords are actually difficult for hackers to determine.

So, after Feb. 5, take the time to make a new password. Investing a small amount of time now will save you lots of time later because you’ll never have to do it again.

 

More Search Tricks in Wayne Connect 365

Last week I provided some tricks for searching through email messages in the new Wayne Connect Powered by Microsoft. Following a question by one of my colleagues, here are some additional keywords and other pieces of search syntax you might find useful.

Binary Operators

You can use AND, OR, and NOT to join search terms. AND means that both items must be present, OR means, of course, either item. NOT excludes the term that follows. Note that these words must be in ALL CAPS. So all of these are legal searches:

elephant AND castle finds messages that contain both ‘elephant’ and ‘castle’.
Jones OR Smith finds any message that has either of those terms.
rutabagas NOT turnip finds all messages that have ‘rutabagas’, but do not also have ‘turnip’

Date Restrictions

It is possible to specify date ranges within searches. You use the operators :< to mean ‘before’, and :> to mean ‘after’. So to find messages between January 1 and March 1 you could write

received:> 1/1/2015 AND received :< 3/1/2015

You can also restrict your search to a particular mailbox by highlighting that mailbox after you search.

Using the minus sign

Finally, for at least some of the keywords, you can place a minus sign – immediately before it, and it will exclude whatever follows the minus. Thus

from:Jones -attachment

will find all messages from Jones that do not have an attachment

and

from:Jones -to:Smith

will find all messages from Jones that are not also to Smith.

More complex searching

My colleague also asked about selecting multiple hits in a search result. Unfortunately this is not quite so easy. Theoretically you can click, then shift-click at the end of a long list, but that seems not to work reliably. The only easy way to select a large number of email messages (in order to drag them to a different mailbox, for example) is not to use the web-based client, but instead to use the Outlook desktop app, which has a very powerful, and very quick search engine.

How to find stuff in Your Office365 Email

Lately I’ve heard folks complain that it’s hard to find back emails in the web interface version of our new email system, because only a few messages are displayed at a time. If this is a problem for you, you can do two things.

1. You can change the display so that the message list is on the left and the message you are looking at is on the right. This looks like this:

Box on right

Do this by going to the gear (top right) and choosing Display Settings, then Show reading pane on right.

2. There is a powerful search engine that allows complex queries. You can just type a name into the box (upper left, labeled ‘Search Mail and People’). That will find all email from and to that person and all messages that mention them.
But you can also type From:Snerdwell and it will only display messages with that name in the ‘From’ field. Similarly for To: and Subject:, although the latter is a little more subtle. If you want subjects that are more than one word long, enclose the words in double quotes: Subject:”Elephants castles” The important point is that you can concatenate (i.e. string together) successive search items. So to find all messages from Snerdwell that contain the word ‘rhinoceros’ you can type From:Snerdwell rhinoceros To find messages with attachments, type hasattachment:yes. If you know the name of the attachment, you can type attachments:presentation.pptx

There are far more subtleties, and you can read about them on the C&IT Knowledgebase.

Has Academica left you apoplectic? Does Wayne Connect leave you feeling disconnected?

New systems come with new puzzles, and our two new connection apps certainly have had that effect. C&IT is offering free training/help over the next few days. All sessions will be held in the Purdy/Kresge Auditorium (use the entrance nearest the Student Center).

The sessions will cover topics from setting up your inbox and syncing Wayne Connect to your mobile device to using streams and getting the most out of our new portal.

Here are the available sessions:

Wednesday, 9/2: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.                             Thursday, 9/10: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Wednesday, 9/2: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.                            Monday, 9/14: 9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, 9/3: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.                                   Monday, 9/14: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Friday, 9/4: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.                                     Friday, 9/18: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Thursday, 9/10: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.                                 Friday, 9/18: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

You can RSVP for these sessions by logging into Academica and clicking on this link:

https://www.eaa.wayne.edu/event_new/session_registration.cfm?eid=1650

Remember you can always call the Help Desk at (313) 577-HELP or emailing helpdesk@wayne.edu

Some additional notes about Outlook 365

By the time you read this, many of us will have been switched over to the new Microsoft-based email system. And, of course, with any new system, there are both things to learn, new features that are cool, old features whose absence is annoying, and the occasional bug. Here are a few things to be aware of.

The interface (how the program looks) is somewhat configurable. You can choose to have a reading pane on the right, below your list of messages, or not at all. You control this through the pull-down marked by a little gear symbol on the upper right.

Gear

If you click that you can choose ‘Display Settings’. You get two sets of options—where the reading pane appears, and whether the system opens the next message or the previous one if you delete a message.

You can also control a lot more things by choosing ‘Options’ under the same menu. There you can choose a number of items associated with Mail, including automatic replies, what happens when you mark something as ‘read’, and so on. Ignore the button marked ‘Retention policies’—it doesn’t do anything.

Options

Under ‘Layout’ you can choose whether to see ‘Conversations’ (all messages with a common subject line together) or not (all messages solely in chronological order). You can also set up your email signature. If you don’t remember yours, just open an old ‘Sent’ message and copy it, then paste it into the relevant window in the ‘Layout’ area.

I’ll have a few more items in my next posting.

More on the New Email System

I’ve been asked how folks will know that they have been transferred to the new Wayne Connect. The answer is that there will be notification emails a week before the transition and one (business) day before. Then, once you have been transferred, the new mail page will look like this:

New Email header

 

 

Because the new Wayne Connect is part of a larger suite of applications (email, Word, Excel etc.) your login page may look like this:

New O365 Portal Page

 

So you’ll have plenty of warning and you’ll be able to tell immediately. Finally, you will receive an informative email message as soon as the transition has taken place.

Wayne Connect Powered by Microsoft is almost here

In late April I blogged about the new email/calendaring/collaboration system that was going to replace our current Wayne Connect email and calendar system based on Zimbra.

As of this week the new software is gradually being implemented across campus, so this is a good time to remind everyone about what to expect. The most important point is that you don’t need to do anything to implement this new email system–it will happen automatically. In fact, if you get a message telling you to ‘click here’ to upgrade your email, delete the message immediately, and, whatever you do, don’t clickit’s a scam (there have been several phishing messages with this theme over the past couple of weeks).

There are a few things you should do, but they are all essentially ‘back-up’ procedures. Although all your email, calendar entries and address book data will be transferred automatically, your signature won’t be, so you’ll need to recreate it. You can either make a copy of the wording (and images, if you use them) or just wait till after the transfer and look for some email you’ve sent (all the ‘Sent’ messages will be in the ‘Sent Items’ folder) and just you can just copy it from an earlier message to the Signature section of the ‘Options’ page. You can find the ‘Options’ button by looking for the little gear symbol in the upper right hand corner.

Although everyone uses Signatures, there are a few other things that won’t transfer but that only affect some people. If you use Filters in Wayne Connect, they will need to be recreated in the new system. They are easy to make–right click on a message you want to be the basis of a Rule (say, anything that comes from that email address) and choose ‘Inbox Rules’, then follow the instructions. If your old filters are complicated, you might want to note them down so that you can implement with the Microsoft system, where they are called ‘Rules’.  Also, Tags won’t transfer, so if you tag your mail, that will also need to be rewritten. Tags are called ‘Categories’ and are based on colors.

Remember that, if you have been using the Wayne Connect Notebook, the files in there will be transferred to your OneDrive area.

Log in more safely

Starting today you’ll see a new log-in screen when you go to the web-based version of Wayne Connect. This is part of a long-term project to unify the log-in screens of all of Wayne’s major services, Blackboard, Academica, and Wayne Connect. Although there are esthetic (and ‘branding’) advantages, the main reason is to help all WSU users make sure they are on the right page for logging in. This is crucial because of the innumerable phishing attempts we seem to be getting these days, all of which encourage us to log in to fake WSU pages.
You don’t actually need to do anything different. The log in process is identical—put in your AccessID and password as before. But if you’re worried, look to see that the address bar in your browser is green, it says https, and that there’s a padlock symbol visible. These are the signals that you are actually connecting to Wayne State, and not a sketchy phishing site in Lower Slobbovia.
Here’s what to look for:

Chrome Log-in

 

Another advantage to this system is that our security office will be able to recognize hacking attempts more easily and will be able to recognize when people have forgotten their passwords and therefore help them in a secure fashion.

The new log-in screen now shows up when you go to Academica and Wayne Connect, and will be phased in for Blackboard and other systems shortly.