Insidious phish preys on your fears of being hacked

The phishers have a new trick–they send you an email purporting to be from iTunes or Amazon that tells you someone hacked your account and bought something. ‘Just click here and reset your password’. I got one the other day–it looked like this:

Screen shot of Apple Phishing message

Hovering over the iTunes link reveals, not ‘’. Apparently Amazon has been having the same problem. Here’s a page from Amazon explaining that they don’t send that kind of email:

So, in short, it’s really important to read url’s, both the obvious ones (many of us got one today that was ‘’) and the ones that only appear when you hover over them. When in doubt, hover. And when in doubt, don’t click.

Help us help you–participate in the ECAR survey

Many WSU faculty (50% of them, to be precise) have been receiving requests to take part in a national survey of faculty attitudes towards technology at the university. The survey is being run by Educause, the national educational IT organization. This is the second year this survey has been run, and last year’s survey produced some interesting results about faculty interests and desires around everything computing-related.

Last year’s results, which are available in ‘infographic’ format here:

Some relevant findings from last year:

  • Nationally, fewer than fifty percent of faculty are satisfied with IT support for research.
  • Opinions on the use of smartphones in class are mixed, with about half of faculty banning or discouraging them and only a third encouraging or requiring laptops (I myself don’t see how I could ban smartphones, and I’ve taught classes where laptops were required because we were all learning how to use some online tool).
  • Many faculty feel they could be better at using web-based content and online collaboration tools in their courses, but there was less enthusiasm about social media as a teaching tool.

There are two versions of the survey, one that takes about twenty minutes to half an hour, and another that takes only ten minutes. Whichever one you choose, your participation will be greatly appreciated, and will help C&IT plan our investments for the next couple of years.

Look for a reminder and your personalized invitation to join in the survey tomorrow. If you don’t get one, you’ll be asked to participate in a more general survey of IT satisfaction that all other faculty, staff and students will take part in later this semester.