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Wayne State University

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Mar 29 / Rana Hammoud

Dashes vs. Hyphens

Here’s a need to know type crime and great reference information!

– hyphen

– en dash

— em dash

A hyphen splits words; post-op, low-budget, twelve-year-old, etc.

An en dash substitues to or til; 9–10. An en dash is also the same length of the n in the type face you are using. (use key: option and -)

An em dash is used to put a thought into a main thought; John was happy — an emotion… An em dash is the same length of the m in the type face you are using. (use key: option, shift, and -)

 

Don’t get these confused not that you know!

Mar 29 / Rana Hammoud

Type Crimes Scavenger Hunt

Over Spring Break, I was to look through Ellen Lupton’s book to learn about the type crimes. I was then asked to go out and find examples around me that portray these type crimes.

Here’s a list of the type crimes-

1. Minimal differences in size

2. Pseudo italics (slanted italics)

3. Adjusted leading (uneven spacing)

4. Pseudo small caps (caps look thin)

5. Different text weights to make fit

6. Bold isn’t bold enough causing the type to compete

7. Similar font for counter

8. Hanging quotation marks (quotation marks need to be in the margins)

9. Signs with wrong apostrophes

10. Tightly tracked text

11. Tracking lowercase letters (too loose)

12. Spacing yields

13. Poorly shaped text boxes (cramped, holes, wedge-shaped, and punctuation at the edge)

14. Stacked small-caps or lowercase

15. Too many signals – paragraph spacing, indents, punctuation (creates indefinite shape)

16. Hyphens and dashes used wrong

17. Hatch marks and quotation marks used wrong

18. Two spaces in sentences

 

Although I didn’t find all of them, here are the ones I did find:

IMG_3920

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IMG_3932

IMG_3934

IMG_3935

 

IMG_3936

IMG_3937

IMG_3938

IMG_3940

IMG_3942

IMG_3944

IMG_3957

IMG_3954

IMG_3945

photo3

photo2

photo1

photo1-2

IMG_3963

IMG_3961

 

I was also asked to create a book out of the best that I could find which can be viewed here as a reference to which images belong to each type crime: Type Crimes

Mar 28 / Rana Hammoud

Constrained Systems Process Work

In this project, I was to design letters to complete 2 give words; expedition (noun) and unmannered (adjective). To create them, I was to choose one shape to use, either a circle or square, while using, at most, 2 modular sized units to then create a modular font. In doing so, a focus was put highly on the grid to create this modular font. This is to keep shapes from overlapping, intersecting, or rotating while allowing them to touch. An emphasis was also placed on the connotations of the words to help to portray the words, through connotations, with the letters. Each letter for each word was to be treated as its own while keeping a system within each of the words.

To begin, I was to find the definitions of the two words along with connotations for the words. My findings are as follows:

Expedition

Definition-

1. A journey undertakes by a group of people with a definite objective

2. Speed in performance; promptness

Sentences-

1. When you have 5 children, every trip is an expedition.

2. Please clean up your room with as much expedition as possible.

Connotations-

Journey, Travel, Passage, Progress, Quest

Unmannered

Definition-

1. Lacking good manners; rude

2. Natural and unaffected

Sentences-

1. He is a refreshingly unmannered person.

2. Some of them are unmannered, rough, intractable, as well as ignorant.

3. The doctor’s quiet unmannered entry.

Connotations-

Disrespectful, Thoughtless, Ungracious, Uncivil

 

With these definitions and connotations, I then went on to do some sketches.

img002 img003 img004 img005 img006 img007img001

Mar 28 / Rana Hammoud

Constrained Systems

In this project, I was to design letters to complete 2 give words; expedition (noun) and unmannered (adjective). To create them, I was to choose one shape to use, either a circle or square, while using, at most, 2 modular sized units to then create a modular font. In doing so, a focus was put highly on the grid to create this modular font. This is to keep shapes from overlapping, intersecting, or rotating while allowing them to touch. An emphasis was also placed on the connotations of the words to help to portray the words, through connotations, with the letters. Each letter for each word was to be treated as its own while keeping a system within each of the words.

Expedition Unmannered

We were also then asked to choose one of the systems and create a poster using the letters we created. This poster did not have to make sense, but, it did have to contain real words.

Poster

Mar 10 / Rana Hammoud

Fictional Letterforms

For this project, we were to create a new, fictional letterform that would fit into a specific chosen font along with the alphabet. I chose the Baskerville font to explore and create a new letter for. In my process, I took up a liking to the descender of the Baskerville G and used that to create a new letter. I wanted to make a letter with this descender because the G is the only one with it. I also wanted something “new” so I took into consideration adding an ascender to my letter along with a descender. In the end, I came up with my new letter which is pronounced “eu” as in “shoe.”

Letter Letter in Alphabet Letter in Word

Mar 1 / Rana Hammoud

Fictional Letterforms Process

For the third project in class, we were to make our own new letter form to fit into a specific font as well as the alphabet. This took a lot of thinking and understanding of how each letter works with the anatomy of how it’s made. To start getting the process going, we were asked to choose from 3 given fonts and draw the A, K, G, and & for the font. I chose Baskerville which is a transitional font.

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This exercise taught me through application how each stroke is made for the Baskerville font. It also helped me to understand the anatomy more such as the serifs, the bowls, the stems, etc. We were then asked to take what we learned from this exercise and apply it by creating all new sketches of our own letterform. I focused on recreating each part of the anatomy of letters in my own way to understand how a letter is made. I then went on and applied this to Baskerville and the alphabet to create my new letter for the alphabet.

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Feb 12 / Rana Hammoud

Class Links

Here are the links to each of the students in the Type 1 class:

 

Justina

https://blogs.wayne.edu/justina

Justine Ross

http://blogs.wayne.edu/justineallenetteross

Tyler

http://blogs.wayne.edu/ominoussilhouette/

Aaron

http://blogs.wayne.edu/dismantlemydisguise/

Samantha

http://blogs.wayne.edu/sambone/

Reem

http://blogs.wayne.edu/reemkhawatmy/

Lisa

http://blogs.wayne.edu/mydesign17/

Kristina

http://blogs.wayne.edu/kgbdigital/

Sarah

http://blogs.wayne.edu/sarahg14/

Arielle

http://blogs.wayne.edu/ariellespring/

Feb 10 / Rana Hammoud

Font Styles Notes

–Old Style/Humanist:

  • Started in the 15–16th century
  • Low contrast in stroke and weight with angled serifs
  • Emulated classic calligraphy
  • Examples include Garamond, Sabon, Bembo, Jenson, Goudy, and Palatino

–Transitional:

  • Bridge between Old Style and Modern serifed typefaces
  • Higher contrast in thick and thins
  • Have more of a vertical axis and sharper serifs
  • Examples include Baskerville, Times New Roman, Utopia, Bookman, and Century

–Modern:

  • Developed in the late 18th century/early 19th century
  • Radical break from the traditional
  • Higher contrast of stroke with straight serifs and a totally vertical axis
  • Examples include Bodoni, Didot, and Walbum

–Slab-serif aka Egyptian:

  • Used for decorative purposes and headlines because it impeded legibility at small point sizes
  • Heavy serifs
  • Examples include Clarendon, Serifa, and Rockwell

–Sans-Serif:

  • Closely related to the characteristics of transitional serif
  • More upright axis and a uniform stroke
  • Examples include Helvetica, Univers, Franklin Gothic, Akzidenz, and Grotesque

–Geometric Sans:

  • Based on geometric forms
  • Examples include Futura, Neutraface, Avante Garde, and Gotham

–Humanist Sans:

  • Humanist characteristics include proportions that were molded on old style typefaces
  • Open strokes and a slightly higher contrast in strokes
  • Examples include Meta, Myriad, Frutiger, and Auto

 

Some need to know terms:

  • glyph–a character in a typeface
  • family–all (bold, italic, etc.) variations within a single font
Feb 10 / Rana Hammoud

Font Mannerisms

For this project, we were given a font and asked to analyze the similarities and differences between that font’s families. The font I was given was Didot which is a modern type face. Didot was designed by Firmin Didot between 1784–1811 at the Linotype foundry.

We were to choose 4 different families from our given font to compare. Of the Didot families, I chose Roman, Italic, Bold, and Small-Caps. Here are the pages of comparisons that I had put together to create a book with:

Roman Bold Italic SmallCaps Axis Comparison Cap Height to X Height Comparison Stroke Comparison Descender Comparison Counter Comparison

Jan 27 / Rana Hammoud

Pentagram

Partners Include:

Lorenzo Apicella, Michael Bierut, Michael Gericke, Luke Hayman, Angus Hyland, Natasha Jen, Domenic Lippa, Abbott Miller, Emily Oberman, Justus Oehler, Eddie Opara, Harry Pearce, Naresh Ramchandani, John Rushworth, William Russell, Paula Scher, Daniel Weil, and Marina Willer

About:

World’s largest independent design consultancy which started in May of 1972.

Owned and run by 19 friends, partners, and leaders in their design fields.

Reside in London, New York, San Francisco, Austin, and Berlin

Always work one-on-one with clients

Believe that “great design cannot happen without passion, intelligence, and personal commitment.”

 

We see their work all around the world. You can go to their website, http://www.pentagram.com to find out more about their studio. You can also see their work in a video made by them, about them, for their 40th anniversary here: http://vimeo.com/42562659.