Do you want to be a privacy officer?

After serving as chief privacy officer for the past year and a half, I will be retiring from Wayne State University at the end of the winter semester. We have been given permission to search for a replacement, so I thought I’d use this platform to say a little about what a Privacy Officer does.

The simplest way to describe it is to link to my Educause blog on “A day in the life of a Chief Privacy Officer.”

However, if you’re interested in the tl;dr1 version, allow me to give you the “elevator speech.” Universities, like nearly all other organizations, hold information about any and all people they deal with. For universities this includes data about students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors. In 2017 it tends to be electronic records, although there are still thousands of pieces of paper with data on them as well.

Some of those records are sensitive. This means that the information could harm the person it refers to if it is released, or that its unauthorized release would subject the university to legal penalties because the data is protected by law. Or both. For example, social security numbers have become toxic (as we say in the privacy world) because those numbers can be used to commit identity theft. Student records such as grades are protected by the federal law known as FERPA and could cost the university embarrassment and money if they are released to unauthorized persons.

The privacy officer’s job is to help the university keep those records safe from inappropriate release by developing policies, by ensuring that employees are trained in how to apply those policies, and by reviewing how new methods of storing data (such as new versions of Banner or Academica) are configured to ensure the data therein is properly locked up.

This means serving on a lot of committees, meeting with administrators and researchers storing sensitive data, and speaking to groups such as the Academic Senate and the Administrative Council. It also means working closely with the Office of General Counsel, Internal Audit, the Associate Provost for Academic Personnel, and serving on the leadership team of C&IT.

If you think you might be interested in learning more about this position, you can find it listed at jobs.wayne.edu under position number 042601.


1 This popular internet acronym stands for ‘too long; didn’t read’. Usually an expression of disapproval.

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