Recent dealings with Stingray

So a guy selling pot is robbed by two other guys. And the police use a Stingray to track the robbers down. Then it went to court. The seller was charged with drug distribution, the other guys with felonies.

A couple of weeks ago a judge asked the police to let him see the famous Stingray device I blogged about last. Turns out the police and prosecutors were so loathe to permit the machine to see the light of day that they offered all the putative criminals plea-bargains and they all ended up with probation.

Whole story here.

It will be interesting to see how many of these cases show up in the next year, as Stingray gets better known, and the ‘non-disclosure’ agreements that police departments sign with the FBI when they get the devices get challenged by judges not impressed with secret superpowerful technologies used to conduct simple criminal investigations.

Some random musings about privacy and what lack of it can do to you.

Three quite unrelated postings on ‘teh webs’ struck me this week. Two deal with what your apps are doing to you. One is a Danish public service announcement about what your apps are doing to you. Food for thought, whether we do anything about it or not, and whether we even could:

http://www.consumersinternational.org/news-and-media/news/2015/01/dcc-video-launch-digital-privacy/

The second is self-explanatory–have you actually read the terms of use of the apps you download? What happens when you do?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcjtEKNP05c

The third is a much longer piece on what can happen to someone who carelessly tweets something they thought was funny. Turns out not everyone is very charitable, and it can literally ruin your life:

Incidentally, this article is an excerpt from Ronson’s forthcoming book.

I have no solutions, just sobering second thoughts.