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Apr 1 / Kristina

Kerned Interventions

KERNING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

My typography class was split into groups of two, my partner was Justina.  Anywho, we were tasked with writing haiku’s about typography Anyways, we were tasked with writing a haiku about typography. Justina and I decided to go with her haiku because it sounded exciting, compared to mines that sounded more simple and straightforward.  Justina was more descriptive, and I enjoyed the words she chose to use.

Warm Golden Letterforms

Bold Glyphs Twisting Into Thought

Spring Forth Eternity

 

That’s pretty deep, right? Yeah I knew you felt the same way :)

The next part of the project was to cut out each letter of each word from black foam core using an Xacto blade… I’m not good at cutting.. so it took about almost 3 years, okay okay maybe not that long but it did take 3 days. So, twenty-nine letters later, my fingers were sore, but my letters came out pretty decent. There is always room for improvement but they weren’t half bad from far away, i’m kidding.  Ater we finally  organized all our letters and mounted them to a wall in Old Main. We chose to do ours through the doors for several reasons:  Normally when people walk up to the thrid floor in old main, your pretty much out of breath or dead tried, so maybe you would like to stop for a second just as your about to climb up those last “few stairs” you notice something on the wall.  You stop and read those beautiful words and it makes your day feel so much better because of how warmful and bright it sounds.  You just had your quote of the day, perfect. The way we set up our letters instead of being close like everyone else,  it was done with spaces on purpose for that reason.  Now if you ever that person that walks up those longs stairs and need to stop to take a break, or just need to hear those beautiful words you will get to enjoy our beautiful typographic masterpiece. Below you can enjoy seeing the process of making this beautiful typographic masterpiece.

Mar 21 / Kristina

HAIKU

Haiku (俳句 high-koo) are short poems that use sensory language to capture a feeling or image. They are often inspired by an element of nature, a moment of beauty or a poignant experience. Haiku poetry was originally developed by Japanese poets, and the form was adapted to English and other languages by poets in other countries

 

Rules for Writing Haiku

There are no specific rules for writing haiku; however, the structure of haiku is always the same, including the following features:

  • Only three lines, totaling 17 syllables throughout
  • The first line must be only 5 syllables
  • The second line must be comprised of 7 syllables
  • The third line must be 5 syllables like the first
  • Punctuation and capitalization rules are up to the poet, and need not follow rigid rules used in structuring sentences
  • Haiku does not have to rhyme, in fact many times it does not rhyme at all
  • Some haiku can include the repetition of words or sounds

MY HAIKU

MY HAIKU

Mar 16 / Kristina

Destruciton & Graceful

FINAL GRACEFUL
DESTRUCTION-Final

UPDATE!!

MORE PROCESS WORK

HAND DRAWN

Hand Drawings Exploring other options, might go uppercase!!!

I was working with a few designs for my words and I came up with these few images.

Process Work

Process Work

Process work

Process work

Process work

Process work

Process Work

Process Work

Process Work

Process Work

Mar 16 / Kristina

Types Of Crime

Types of Crime

ELLEN LUPTON

 Ellen LuptonOur assignment over spring break was to read through Ellen  Lupton’s book “Thinking with type” and find and recognize all the different types of crime related to type. Reading through I found more than expected and was quiet overwhelm by how many I found throughout her book starting at page 38-211.  Also, Ellen’s book has a website that is very helpful, so if you are not able to get your hands on a hard copy of her book, then check out the website. Below I will provide a few examples of these type crimes as well as a link to the website. Check it out!

 

Be careful there are eyes watching you everywhere….

Proportions (38)
  • Proportions of  letters have been digitally distorted in order to create wider or narrower letters.
Effects of Type Size (41)
  • Some typefaces that work well at large sizes look too fragile when reduced.
Scale (42)
  • Minimal differences in type size make this design look boring and ineffective.
Small caps (52)
  • Pseudo small caps, These automatically generated characters look puny and starved; they are an abomination against nature
  • Stack of capital and lowercase letters, the spaces between lines appear uneven because caps are tall but have no descenders
Combining typefaces (54)
  • Using typefaces from the same family but they are too close in weight to mix well.
  • Using type styles that are too similar to provide a counterpoint to each other
  • When mixing font sizes/weights/styles, be cautious that the difference is effective.
Punctuation (58-59)
  • Quotation marks carve out chunks of white space from the edge of the text. Use “hanging” quotation marks in the margin to avoid this problem.
  • Prime or hatch marks indicate inches and feet.
  • Apostrophes signal contraction or possession.
  • Quotation marks set off dialogue.

 

Tracking (104-108)
  • Tightly tracked text ; letters are tracked too close for comfort.
  • Tracking lowercase letters; loosely spaced lowercase letters–especially italics–look awkward because these characters are designed to sit closely together on a line.
  • Automatic line spacing can have an uneven effect.
Alignment (112-113)
  • Poorly shaped text block; in most uses, centered text should be broken into phrases with a variety of long and short lines.
  • Full of holes; a column that is too narrow is full of gaps
  • Bad rag; an ugly wedge shape spoils the ragged edge.
  • Punctuation eats the edge; excessive punctuation weakens the right edge.
Stacked (120)
  • Stacked lowercase letters; vertical lowercase letters seem awkward because of the ascenders and descenders messing up the spacing.
Paragraph spacing (127)
  • Using too many signals; using paragraph spacing and indents together squanders space and gives the text block a flabby, indefinite shape.
Signals ( 132)
  • Too many signals; emphasis can be created with just one shift, but using underlining, bold, italics, caps, and punctuation is overkill.

 

Data ( 204)
  • Data prison; the rules and boxes used in data tables should illuminate the relationships among data, not trap each entry inside a heavily guarded cell. Spaces and punctuation; em/en/hyphen

Even more crimes..  pg. 211

  • Two hyphens in place of an em dash.
  • Hyphens are used between numbers.
  • An en dash is used for a hyphenated word.
  • Prime marks (aka dumb quotes) used in place of quotation marks.
  • Two spaces between sentences.Thinking With Type

 

 

 

 

WEBSITE ———> http://thinkingwithtype.com/

Few examples of what I found..

TYPE CRIME

Feb 28 / Kristina

Class Links

LINKS TO OTHER BLOGS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Justina ( ´ ▽ ` )ノ

https://blogs.wayne.edu/justina

Justine Ross  (∩▂∩)

http://blogs.wayne.edu/justineallenetteross

Tyler    (╯◕_◕)╯

http://blogs.wayne.edu/ominoussilhouette/

Rana ( ̄へ ̄)

http://blogs.wayne.edu/ranahammoud/

Aaron ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ

http://blogs.wayne.edu/dismantlemydisguise/

Samantha  。◕ ‿ ◕。

http://blogs.wayne.edu/sambone/

Reem  (∪ ◡ ∪)

http://blogs.wayne.edu/reemkhawatmy/

Lisa (☞゚∀゚)☞

http://blogs.wayne.edu/mydesign17/

Sarah (=ω=;)

http://blogs.wayne.edu/sarahg14/

Arielle (┳◇┳)

http://blogs.wayne.edu/ariellespring/

Feb 28 / Kristina

Wim Crouwel

 

Wim Crouwel

Spans six decades and covers an extraordinary journey from designer, teacher, curator to museum director.

Wim Crouwel

BEGINNINGS

  • His education began at the Minerva Academy, Groningen where he studied fine art.
  • Crouwel found inspiration in the concrete, glass and steel of what was one the first modernist buildings in the Netherlands, this was the beginning of a life-long passion for architecture.

TOWARDS DESIGN

  • Crouwel began his career in design as an exhibition designer.
  • Began work for  an exhibition company Enderberg, learning from the designer Dick Ellfers.
  • He then set up his own studio with the interior designer Kho Liang Ie.
  • He learnt the principles of typography through his tutor, Charles Jongejans (who also exposed him to modernist graphic design for the first time)
  • Crouwel established a consistent and distinctive visual language creating striking design solutions for a range of clients.

MODERNISM

  • Crouwel was influenced by Swiss design, structure and the employment of grids became key aspects in his visual language.

VAN ABBEMUSEUM, EINDHOVEN

  • In 1954, one of the most significant and long-lasting working relationships began when he met the then director of the Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Edy de Wilde.
  •  De Wilde & Crouwel,  shared  an interest in abstract art and appreciation for the value of good design.
  • De Wilde appointed Crouwel as the sole designer for the museum, giving him complete creative autonomy and fully supporting his approach to design.
  • The posters and catalogues designed for the Van Abbemuseum saw a significant conceptual development in Crouwel’s approach.
  • Crouwel created bespoke, hand-drawn, typographic images to evoke the subject matter or work of the artist.

TOTAL DESIGN

  • Crouwel was one of the five founders of Total Design.
  • The name Total acknowledges the mixed skill-set of the partners.

STEDELIJK MUSEUM, AMSTERDAM

  • Crouwel established a grid-based methodology for the Stedelijk, a system which he applied rigorously from 1963 to 1985.
  • This approach gave the Museum’s publicity material huge flexibility, while retaining a recognisable visual language.

EXPERIMENTAL TYPOGRAPHY

  • Crouwel is recognised for the creation of radical, modular letterforms. Pushing the boundaries of legibility.
  • Crouwel’s innovative type was often supported by easily read sans serif typefaces within a carefully structured framework.
  • His typefaces were digitised by the Foundry in the late nineties and are available for designers to use digitially from the type library.

DESIGNER, DIRECTOR, TEACHER

  • In 1985 Crouwel’s career  as a director at the Boijmans van Beuningen Museum in Rotterdam.
  • He commissioned the British studio 8vo to fulfil the design requirements of the museum.
  • He retired from this position in 1993.
  • Crouwel continues to design intermittently on a diverse range of projects for both graphic and exhibition design commissions.

 

Wim Crouwel Calendar The typographic treatment applied here is inspired by the iconic calendar designs of Dutch graphic designer and typographer, Wim Crouwel.

Wim Crouwel Calendar
The typographic treatment applied here is inspired by the iconic calendar designs of Dutch graphic designer and typographer, Wim Crouwel.

 

Wim Crouwel Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel
Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel
Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel
Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel
Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel
Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel
Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

Wim Crouwel
Kalender 1964 Calendar 1963 designed by Wim Crouwel, Erven E de Geer Printers, Amsterdam.

http://vimeo.com/21972945

Here is a link where Wim Crouwel talks brief about his life and Typography! Check it out :)

Feb 28 / Kristina

Project 4: Constrained Systems

Description

Design and apply a letterform system.

  • Use only one basic shape (modular).
  • Design only the glyphs necessary to complete the words.
  •  Letterforms (not the word) communicate connotation(s) in consonance
  • with word-meaning.
  • Modular system of letters out of only squares or circles (our choice

Nouns  Adjectives

Definition Of Destruction

  • The action of process of causing so much damage, something that is no longer exist or can not be repaired.
  • The act of destroying or state of being destroyed; demolition.
  • Cause of means of destroying 

Connotations For Destruction 

 

 Broken
 Damaged
Anger
Chaos
Demolished
Pieces

Creative Destruction Chaos Destruction Broken

Destruction

Destruction

Chaos Destruction chaos Explosive Anger Explosive Damage

Definition Of Graceful

  • Having or showing grace or elegance
  • Characterized by elegance or beauty of form, manner, movement or speech; elegant.

 

 

Connotations Of Graceful

Flowing
Smooth
Neat
Delicate 
Easy 
Fine 

Feb 24 / Kristina

PROJECT 3: FICTIONAL LETTER FORM

UPPER AND LOWERCASE

 

I found this project to be a little difficult for me but overall I enjoyed making a new letter. Hopefully I can improve and make a different one that actually will go into the alphabet one day :P

 

 

DEF!

Letter fictional form I created is named def.

 

 

 

 

In this project we had to design our own letter! I did really working on this project and I learned a lot about New Baskerville

 

SKETCHES SKETCHES SKETCHES SKETCHES SKETCHES

 

 

 

 

 

27 Letter to the Alphabet!

Did you know that there is 26…I mean 27! Letters to the alphabet?!!

I didn’t either until now..

Here is Ick!

 

This is Ick he is the "27 letter" to the alphabet.

This is Ick he is the “27 letter” to the alphabet.

Still working on blending Ick with in the rest of the alphabet.
Seems to bold to me.
What do you think?

Ick in the alphabet lower case alphabet, how to pronounce it as well as it in a sentence.

Ick in the alphabet lower case alphabet, how to pronounce it as well as it in a sentence.

Feb 13 / Kristina

Project 2: Font Mannerisms. Part 3 Expressive Composition (Design)

This part of the project I found to be a little difficult but at the end it was helpful. I had to review the definition of my font making sure again that the words I described it as was exactly what it was. I believe I came out successful with this and my project overall. Especially since this my first time using Adobe Illustrator. Hope you enjoyed :) 

C U R V Y

C U R V Y

PART III: Expressive compositions

1. Select two from the eight descriptive words in Part I.
2. Brainstorm a list of connotations for each word. This is a method to help you start to 
think about the visual possibilities of your word.
3. Create one visual composition for each word (two compositions total) that expresses 
the connotations of that word. For example, if one of your words is “Exciting” you would 
create a visual composition, using selected glyphs from your typefamily as the formal 
components, to express connotations associated with “Exciting.”
4. Do not spell your word. You need to express it. 
Constraints
• No full words. 
• Minimum of two letterforms / no maximum.
• Select from the full range of glyphs in the selected font to express the connotations.
• No cutting letters. Isolate details by way of scale and cropping only.
• No squewing, stretching or applying filters to letters. 
• Letters may not reverse out (white on black).

 

E L E G A N T

E L E G A N T

Feb 13 / Kristina

Project 2: Font Mannerisms. Part 2.2: Family features

Comparing the eye's showing the difference in them by highlighting the inside of each of the eyes while using color to make it visually appealing.

Comparing the eye’s showing the difference in them by highlighting the inside of each of the eyes while using color to make it visually appealing.

 

Comparing the Terminals by alining the f's together but to make it visually appealing I decided to change the color as well as flipping them in the opposite direction.

Comparing the Terminals by alining the f’s together but to make it visually appealing I decided to change the color as well as flipping them in the opposite direction.

PART 2.2: Visual analysis

 Using letters in “outline” form, create four (4) compositions within the 9×12 rectangle,
documenting comp

Comparing the serifs showing the difference in them by lining them up at the bottom and to make it more visually appealing  I decided as well to use color.

Comparing the serifs showing the difference in them by lining them up at the bottom and to make it more visually appealing I decided as well to use color.

 

 Showing that there is a difference in all the g's. Some have ears, some don't.  As well as uing the circles to help show my viewers what to look at directly without telling them exactly what i'm talking about. Using the colors as well helped make it visually appealing.

Showing that there is a difference in all the g’s. Some have ears, some don’t. As well as uing the circles to help show my viewers what to look at directly without telling them exactly what i’m talking about. Using the colors as well helped make it visually appealing.