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Posts tagged ‘letters’

Spring Break Letter-Pressing

So I had an amazing spring break… one of the things I had the opportunity to do was to go to Signal Return Letter Press in Downtown Detroit and make some postcards… Below are a few of the ones I played around with. I really got a thrill out of doing this all by hand, and it definitely makes you appreciate the craft a lot more since it’s very time-consuming and tedious. I loved making this post cards and I definitely am more interested in hand-setting type and printing things the old-fashioned way! Hopefully I’ll get to go back soon and make some more 🙂

 

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17 Mar 2013

Inspiration

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I like the transparency of this design because it’s interesting and captivating but doesn’t look muddled or pointless. The color scheme is also very nice and soothing.

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7 Mar 2013

Accidental Mysteries

Here’s a really cool post I found on the Design Observer site. It talks about this German Book from the 17th Century that basically is just a compilation of different calligraphy styles applied to the alphabet. What’s truly amazing is that each page gets more and more ornate. The time it took to make these is probably ridiculous, and I definitely don’t have a steady enough hand to do something like this so I definitely respect and admire it! Take a look.

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I think it gets to a certain point where some of these are borderline-beyond-legible, but amazing to look at nonetheless!

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7 Mar 2013

New vs Old

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I stumbled upon an article on Eye Magazine.com that talks about Monotype’s typographical adviser, Stanley Morison, who published an article about newspaper design (that I didn’t get to fully read yet).

The quote next to this picture states “This cover photograph, probably conceived by Beatrice Warde, is the likely cause of the misconception that there was a typeface called ‘Times Old Roman’ prior to October 1932. Before that year’s redesign The Times had used a version of Monotype Modern, which was adapted from a typeface created by the Edinburgh foundry Miller & Richards.”

I think it’s just a cool looking poster and comes up with the idea of an ‘Times Old Roman’, even thought it never existed, yet you can clearly see the difference between the two typefaces.

 

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7 Mar 2013

Coffee & Cigarettes

This truly is a genius design in my opinion. Combining images and the simple letterform of an ampersand to basically state the title of the film without using any photographic images is impressive. If you took away ‘Coffee and cigarettes’ at the bottom, after spending some time looking at it, one would be able to recognize that there is a coffee cup in the bowl of the ampersand and that the end of it resembles the butt of a cigarette. This design is very simplistic yet imaginative since you really have to look at the form to understand what is being presented to you. Also, the fact that the ampersand was most likely not altered to fit the images into it (such as it wasn’t skewed or twisted, etc) also adds to the fascination and beauty of this piece. Also the use of a beige-type of background reminds you of the effect a coffee stain would have on a white table, or how the cigarette paper burns as you smoke it. There’s a feeling of simplicity and sophistication in this piece since it makes you feel like all you need is some coffee and cigarettes (:

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21 Nov 2012

Final Constrained Systems

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Sluggish

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15 Nov 2012

Living Letters

Another great example of hand-drawn lettering. Not only do I like this because it’s done manually, but it’s extremely expressive. It’s use of a calming, cool color and the vines sprouting out from all over the letter contrast the mechanical designs inside of the letter itself. The letter just seems to burst into life and breaks all the rules and barriers that a typical letter should have. I think this is great inspiration to how Typography can be extremely expressive, and you can essentially make it whatever you want it to be.

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12 Nov 2012

Truth

 

I couldn’t agree more with this poster. Not only do I feel Typography is such a beautiful thing to study and practice, but there is so much respect for hand-lettering that I think is lost nowadays due to technology and printing. This is a dynamic composition since you have this bar going across diagonally that really emphasizes that hand-lettering is a lost ‘ART’, not just a skill. The various decorative typefaces are very interesting and play off of each other since they’re all so different. The words also kind of jump off the board and come at you, which also caught my eye when I saw this piece. I’m not sure who did it or where it’s from, but I think it’s gorgeous and I only wish that one day I can accomplish such precision and perfection in my hand-drawn designs.

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12 Nov 2012

Jan Tschichold

Here’s another cool poster I found breaking down letters, this one is by Jan Tschichold. Just like the Baskerville poster I found a while back, I think this one excellently represents how letters are formed from basic circles and lines. I’m not sure what typeface this is but I would assume it’s an old style serif because it’s very classical-looking, is obviously a serif, and there is not significant contrast in the thickness and thinness of the letterforms.

12 Nov 2012

Readings

Reform & Revolution

  • Some designers thought distortion of the alphabet was gross and warned against it
  • Avant-garde designers rejected the quest for essential letters grounded in the human hand and body
  • At the Bauhaus, letters were constructed from basic geometric forms – squares, circles, triangles

Type as Program

  • Wim Crouwel created designs for a new alphabet purely from straight lines… these letters were designed for optimal display on a video screen.
  • In the mid-1980s computers and low-res printers made typography more accessible to the public
  • PostScript and high-res printers in the 1990s created less contraints for type designers.

Type as Narrative

  • Designers became unsatisfied with clean, unsullied surfaces and wanted to make letters more harsh and disorderly
  • Template Gothic is designed based on letters drawn with a plastic stencil
  • Dead History combines Centennial and VAG Rounded – manipulated the vectors of readymade fonts (strategy often used in contemporary art and music)]
  • Beowulf was the first typeface to have random outlines and programmed behaviors

 

 

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3 Nov 2012