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Laurie Haycock : Cranbrook Lecture

So I went to listen to a lecture by Laurie Haycock at Cranbrook a few weeks ago, and it was definitely interesting, but quite beautiful. Most of the lecture she talked about the work she and her husband (Scott P. Makela) made together, and it was a tragic love story (Scott passed away very suddenly and she has been a widow for about 14 years now).

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One of her Husband’s greatest accomplishments that she touched on was the typeface he created, called Dead History. It is licensed by Emigre and is a combination of serif and sans-serif typefaces. Scott used this typeface a lot in his pieces, and I think it’s very innovative and has a unique style to it that cannot be recreated.

DeadHistorySample

 

Laurie seemed to focus a lot more on her husband’s work than her own, so below is one of the pieces her husband worked on. She said he was very obsessed with using the ‘twirl’ tool when designing thing (as evident in the picture) and it was very forward-thinking and dynamic in their time.

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Lastly, one of the projects that Laurie and Scott were most proud of seemed to be the typeface used in the opening of Fight Club that some of their students actually created. I’ve never seen Laurie or her husband’s work before going to this lecture so it was nice that she mentioned something that has a much wider audience and received a lot of fame (since everyone has heard of Fight Club!). 297fdfbbd61e566cdb094faa81d963ad

 

Overall the lecture was very emotional since she definitely focused on the connection between her and her husband and how that affected the art they created.. They were great partners in life and in art and I am glad I went to the lecture and got to experience that. It also helped me to realize that I should break out of my shell and indulge myself more into my work to create something original and dynamic rather than something that will please everybody.

 

 

Posted by Amanda Fairchild on April 20, 2013

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